Popovers – ‘Let me count the ways…’ (A new addition to The Popover Experiment.)

These may be the easiest popovers to make – ever!

Crusty outside and drier than most popovers inside – great for filling with chicken salad etc.  Or ice cream and chocolate sauce, which tastes like an eclair!

A while back I did a series of popover recipes which I called The Popover Experiment.  I had a lot of fun – and ate a lot of popovers – while working on that series of recipes.  It’s truly amazing how many variations of popover recipes there are. And I can say with all honesty that I’ve never eaten a popover I didn’t enjoy!

Recently I made popovers for my grandchildren while visiting with my son’s family. I found this recipe in my son’s 1980’s edition of  the Good Housekeeping Illustrated Cook Book., which I used religiously when my sons were teenagers.  (Awhile ago I purchased used copies for both my sons, so they now each have their own copies of the same cookbook I used when they were growing up!)

As you can see in the photo above, these popovers are huge and crusty.  The centers are drier than most popovers, perfect for filling with chicken salad etc. – OR – ice cream and chocolate sauce!  Of course, all popovers are delicious just slathered with butter and a bit of jam.

Here’s my grandson’s idea – melted chocolate.  He was one happy boy!!  ; o )

Popovers with Melted Choc. Chips - myyellowfarmhouse.com  - COOPER'S IDEA!
We sprinkled on some chocolate chips and melted them a bit in the microwave – YUMMY!

Oven at 375 F       Bake for 50 minutes

++ Grease popover pans if they’re not ‘nonstick’.

INGREDIENTS

  •  3 eggs
  • 1 cup milk
  • 3 Tbs. butter
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ tsp. salt.

Beat 3 eggs, 1 cup milk and 3 Tbs. butter at high speed until foamy.  Add 1 cup all-purpose flour & ½ tsp. salt.  Beat until combined and foamy.

Bake at 375F for 50 minutes.  Pierce each popover with a knife to allow steam to escape.

++  Recipe courtesy of the 1980’s edition of the Good Housekeeping Illustrated Cook Book

Popovers - Creamy on the Inside and Crispy on the Outside n- myyellowfarmhouse.com

Crunchy, Nutty Apple Crisp with a Sprinkling of Bacon

Sprinkling on bits of crispy bacon during the last few minutes of baking is, of course, optional. But it sure is a fun option!  

5-crunchy-nutty-apple-crisp-with-a-sprinkling-of-bacon-my-yellow-farmhouse

I always have such good intentions.  I always buy lots of fruit and I always throw away some of that fruit.  This time I put those soft apples to good use and baked one of my favorite old-fashioned desserts – Apple Crisp.  Sprinkling on bits of crispy bacon towards the end of the baking time gives this dessert an new twist.

You know, I actually prefer eating apple crisp at room temperature, but that didn’t keep me from giving myself a big serving while it was still hot.

Except for coring, peeling and cutting the apples, this dessert takes very little time to prepare.

small red heart

8 – 9 inch square cake pan        Bake at 350F for 30 – 35 minutes

Add chopped, cooked bacon 5 minutes before apple crisp is ready to come out of the oven.

Ingredients

    Apple Filling

  • 7 cups peeled, sliced apples
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/4 tsp. cinnamon
  • 3 pinches nutmeg
  • 1 Tbs. flour     ++ Flour helps thicken the apple juices
  • 1/4 tsp. salt

    Topping

  • 1/2 cup brown sugar   ++  Just leveled, not ‘packed’    
  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 4 Tbs COLD butter, cut into small pieces
  • 2 pinches salt
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts or pecans
  • 2 – 3 Tbs. roughly chopped cooked bacon  To be added during last few minutes of baking.

++  As the old expression goes, “Live and Learn’.  I learned that finely chopping the cooked bacon was NOT the way to go, so I recommend doing a rough chop.  Also, it’s better if the bacon is slightly crispy… not super crispy.  

Method

In a large bowl mix 7 cups peeled, sliced apples, 1/3 cup sugar, 1/4 tsp. cinnamon, 3 pinches nutmeg, 1 Tbs. flour and 1/4 tsp. salt.  Pour into a square baking pan.

Place 1/2 cup brown sugar, 3/4 cup all-purpose flour, 4 Tbs cold butter (cut into small pieces) and 2 pinches salt in a medium bowl.  Using a pastry cutter, or two knives, mix ingredients until it resembles coarse crumbs.  Add 1/2 cup chopped walnuts or pecans.  (Do NOT add the bacon!)

Sprinkle crumb mixture evenly over the sliced apples.  Bake at 350F for 30 – 35 minutes.  The apple filling should be bubbling and the topping should be browned.

++ If adding 2 – 3 Tbs. chopped cooked bacon – sprinkle it on 5 minutes before apples crisp is fully cooked.    Enjoy!

6-crunchy-nutty-apple-crisp-with-a-sprinkling-of-bacon-my-yellow-farmhouse

 

Indian-Inspired Chicken Stew – – Mildly Flavored with Cardamom, Coriander etc.

We had snow storm here in Western Massachusetts – only a few inches – but the streets were a disaster and I never made it to the grocery store.  (I tell you, it sure is amazing how resourceful you can be when you’re hungry.)  I dug around a bit in the old ‘larder’ and found two large half chicken breasts and peas in the freezer, a package of precooked diced potatoes, a half bag of baby carrots, a bit of ‘half and half’ cream, sour cream and cashews. I have a pretty good assortment of spices in the cupboard, so I decided to prepare a dish inspired by the spices of India.

The resulting stew has a lovely. subtle flavor because I added just a small amount of each of the spices.  So subtle in fact, that even a professed ‘disliker of Indian food’ (if there is such a person) would very much enjoy this Indian-Inspired Chicken Stew.

I used chicken, since that’s what I had on hand, but you could use whatever you happen to have – pork, for example.  Have leftover vegetables – add them in.  Want a more robust taste – add more of each spice.  Want a bit more heat – add more red pepper flakes.  Don’t have sour cream. Add more ‘half and half’.  As I like to say, “Make it yours’!

small red heart

++ For an easy and delicious homemade chicken broth, place a rotisserie chicken carcass, along with some of the skin, in a large saucepan or Dutch Oven.  Add enough water to cover. Add some chopped onion, carrots & celery.  Add a bit of poultry seasoning, salt and pepper, and simmer for about an hour – uncovered.  Stir occasionally and turn chicken carcass over once or twice.  Allow to cool.  Strain broth through a colander placed over a large bowl.  And there you are!  An excellent chicken broth to use right away – or freeze in a ziplock gallon bag for later use. 

INGREDIENTS

I used jarred spices.  If you have fresh, so much the better!

  • 1 Tbs. butter      ++  Recipe calls for a total of 3 Tbs. butter
  • 1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper
  • 4 pinches cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp. turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp. ground coriander
  • 1/2 tsp. ground cardamon
  • 1/2 tsp. dried cilantro
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1 Tbs. butter
  • 1/3 cup chopped green pepper
  • 1 onion, roughly chopped – about 1 cup
  • 1 tsp. fresh minced garlic – 2 to 3 cloves
  • 4 cups peeled, diced and cubed potatoes       ++ You could use sweet potatoes – or a mixture of both    ++  I used a (20 oz) bag of  Just Potatoes Diced Potatoes for two reasons…. I had it in my fridge & because the potatoes have already been peeled, diced and cooked, which I really like!
  • 1 Tbs. butter
  • 2 chicken breast halves, cut into chunks
  • 2 1/2 cups cut baby carrots – cut into 1/3″ pieces
  • 2 1/2 cups frozen peas, thawed  ++ Run the peas under hot water to thaw
  • handful of  whole cashews
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • Added at the end  …..  2/3 cups half and half cream  &   1/2 cup sour cream

METHOD

Over medium heat, allow a stockpot or Dutch Oven to heat up a bit. Add 1 Tbs. butter,  1/2 tsp. dried cilantro, 1/2 tsp. ground cardamon, 1/2 tsp. ground coriander, 1/2 tsp. turmeric, 4 pinches cinnamon, 1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper and 1/3 tsp. salt. Cook, stirring, for about 30 seconds.

Add another tablespoon butter, 1/3 cup chopped green pepper and 1 cup chopped onion. Cook, stirring occasionally, until green pepper and onions are softened.  Add 1 tsp.minced garlic. Cook just until garlic softens, then add 4 cups peeled, diced and cubed potatoes. (Potatoes do NOT have to be cooked first.)  Continue cooking and stirring occasionally for another few minutes.  Remove spice and vegetable mixture for now.

Add another 1 Tbs. butter and chicken breast chunks.  Cook until chicken is no longer pink on the outside.  (The inside can be pink because chicken will finish cooking while stew simmers.)  Add in the set-aside spice and veggies.  Add 2 1/2 cups cut baby carrots, 2 1/2 cups thawed peas, a handful of cashews and 4 cups chicken broth. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes.

Turn off heat. Add 2/3 cups half and half cream and 1/2 cup sour cream until combined

Enjoy!    Or, in Hindi, ka aanand len.

7-indian-inspired-chicken-stew-myyellowfarmhouse-com

 

‘Recipe Roundup No. 2’ ….. Super Bowl Snack Ideas

I follow lots of terrific food blogs and recently I decided to ‘share the wealth’ by posting a weekly Recipe Roundup.  Each Roundup features four delicious recipes from four different bloggers. 

When I first began my little food blog the main idea was to share recipes, which we all love to do.  (I’m sure many of you have a file of recipes either copied from friends, ripped out of magazines or found online.)  What I hadn’t expected was the joy I would find in making lots of new friends! 

This week features recipes from Foodie Crush, My Favourite Pastime,  Damn Delicious  &  Chef Mimi.    Enjoy!

small red heart 

Heidi, of Foodie Crush, blogs from Salt Lake City and calls herself a ‘recipe maker, picture taker, lover of food bloggers and their recipes and photos. 

Follow this link for Heidi’s recipe for Cheesy Texas Trash Dip

Cheesy-Texas-Trash-Dip-foodiecrush.com.jpg
Cheesy Texas Crab Dip

 

Liz hails from Canada, hence the name of her blog is My Favourite Pastime – with that added ‘u’ we Americans no longer use for some reason.  Liz is a prolific baker but she shares great recipes of all kinds.

Follow this link to Liz’s recipe for Chicken Legs with Bacon & Ricotta Stuffing

chicken-with-bacon-and-ricotta-stuffing-myfavouritepastime-com_4648.jpg
Chicken with Bacon and Ricotta Stuffing

 

Mimi, whose wonderful blog is called Chef Mimi, has been involved in many aspects of ‘the food world’ including  being a personal chef, a caterer, a food columnist and a cooking school teacher etc.  etc.

Follow this link to Mimi’s recipe for crab dip.

Crab Dip - Chef Mimi.com.jpg
Crab Dip

 

Chungah, of Damn Delicious, resides in California with her Corgi named Butters. Chungah like to say she cooks in a closet-sized kitchen.  Closet-sized or not, she does a great job.

Follow this link to Chungah’s Cheesy Chicken and Broccoli Pockets

Cheesy-Chicken-and-Broccoli-Pockets - courtesy of Damn Delicious.jpg
Cheesy Chicken and Broccoli Pockets

See you at the next Roundup, partner!

 

copy-recipe-roundup

Historic and Unusual Recipes – – French Canadian Blood Pudding Recipe a.k.a Boudin

Blood Pudding (or sausages) are served in French, Belgian, German, British, Quebec, Acadian, Creole, Austrian and Cajun cuisine.

This Blood Pudding a.k.a. Boudin is baked in loaf pans instead of sausage casing. 

boudin-noir-courtesy-of-banque-dimages
Boudin Noir, or as the British say, Black Pudding. This version will look similar in color and texture.

Photo courtesy of Banque D’Images

This is my 2nd post in the category Historic and Unusual Recipes.  The first was How to Cook a Terrapin (or Turtle).  I discovered that recipe in a very old Fanny Farmer Cookbook and posted it simply because I found it interesting. Guess what?  Almost every day… week in and week out… How to Cook a Terrapin (or Turtle) appears in my list of ‘Readers Recent Favorites’. Who woulda thunk it?  And now it’s gonna be interesting to see how well received this French Canadian Blood Pudding recipe is!   ; o )

I made French Canadian Blood Pudding only once, using the blood from one of the pigs we raised. We planned to roast the pig on a special spit – and feed the neighbors, the local family, the family from Montreal and the family from the States. Luckily it was a BIG pig. So big it actually broke the rented spit… but that’s another story.

My husband’s family all told me I’d fed my pigs too much because, when butchered, they all had a lot of fat. They said I ‘babied’ all my animals.  Hey, if you were a pig… and it was hot… wouldn’t you be happy if someone gently sprayed you with cold water.  Of course you would.  I rest my case.

My husband’s aunt Therese and I prepared the Blood Pudding at the Roy Family Farm in St. Flavien, Quebec (Canada) where my husband’s family has lived/farmed for the last seven generations. It’s a huge house with a huge kitchen. There’s a wood burning stove and a modern stove – a lovely mixture of old and new.  (I remember visiting around 1970 and there was still a water pump in ‘The Summer Kitchen’.  I’ll explain about Summer Kitchens another time.)

I just deleted the paragraph about hanging the pig upside down etc.  I didn’t want to gross you out any more than necessary..  

When I arrived at the old family farm with my bucket of pig blood, Ma Tante Therese (My Aunt in French.) was armed and ready with the necessary utensils and pans. Ma Tante didn’t speak much English and my French is far from great, but I managed to write down several of her old French Canadian recipes over the years, including this one for Blood Pudding, while I either helped or watched her cook.  And an excellent cook she was.

My husband LOVED the Blood Pudding we’d made.  And I was pretty darn proud of myself, let me tell you.  I did take a tiny taste of it… Blood Pudding has an unusual texture – no surprise there. It does taste pretty good, if you can get beyond the ‘main ingredient’.

My husband loved to eat his Boudin cut into slices and fried.  He especially loved it for breakfast with scrambled eggs.  At the time I made the Blood Pudding my husband could only eat soft things due to oral cancer.  You can imagine how pleased I was, especially at that point in his life, to have prepared something for him which he’d loved his whole life.  

Life is short. Prepare your loved ones favorite dishes.  Doing so truly is a gift of love! 

small red heart

This recipe for French Canadian Blood Pudding (Boudin) is prepared in two loaf pans. 

I’m going to give you the recipe as I wrote it down – although sometimes I’ve written recipes from our French Canadian Aunts half in French and half in English.

Fresh blood from one pig

Strain the blood to get the clots out.  If clots are big, remove them with a big wooden spoon.

Add the exact same amount of milk as there is blood.

Put milk and blood into a large bowl.

Add:

1 ½ large onions   – cut up very fine

1 pound pig lard (fat)  ++  from the pig 

2 Tbs. salt

1 Tbs. pepper   ++  Not a full tablespoon.  And Ma Tante used an actual soup spoon.

1 Tbs. ground cloves   ++  Not a full tablespoon.  And Ma Tante used an actual soup spoon.

Grease two bread pans with oil.

Pour blood mixture into pans.

Cook at 400 for one hour. Enjoy!    ++ I recommend cutting the Boudin into slices or squares and frying it. 

After the rain comes the rainbow.  (Our farm in St. Antoine de Tilly, Quebec)

Rainbow-Fall 2005.jpg

 

‘Recipe Roundup’ – Sharing Recipes from Some of the Wonderful Bloggers I Follow ++ A new idea I hope you enjoy!!

So many recipes – so little time.  I follow about 30 fabulous food bloggers and I’ve forced myself to not add more.  I’d be perfectly content ‘checking out delicious recipes’ all day long… Recently I had an idea – to start sharing some of those great recipes by doing a weekly Roundup’.  I hope you like it.   ; o )

small red heart

From my friend John of ‘The Bartolini Kitchens’ – ‘Panettone Pain Perdu’ & ‘Panettone Bread Pudding’

John is an amazing cook who lives in Chicago & has a killer sense of humor!  I hope to make his Panettone Bread Pudding with Orange Sauce either today or tomorrow.

panettone-bread-pudding-courtesy-of-the-bartolini-kitchens

‘Easy Toffee Bars from Trish at ‘Mom on Timeout’.

Trish is another blogger who ‘does it all’. A self-described ‘Stay at Home Mom’, her blog is loaded with craft ideas and recipes etc.

Easy Toffee Bars - courtesy of 'Mom on Timeout'.jpg

From Pam of ‘Brooklyn Farm Girl’ – Easy Slow Cooker Cabbage Roll Casserole

Pam ‘does it all’.  She’s an artist in NYC who started ‘farming’ on her rooftop in Brooklyn.  This year she expanded her farming to a property in New York State. Her recipes often include her ‘couldn’t be any fresher’ produce.

Slow-Cooker-Cabbage-Rolls-Casserole - courtesy of Brooklyn Farm Girl.jpg

Here’s a simple and delicious recipe for ‘Old Fashioned Sweet Bread’ from ‘The ‘Southern Lady Cooks’

‘The Southern Lady’s’ recipes are always family-friendly, easy and delicious.

old-fashioned-sweet-bread-courtesy-of-the-southern-lady-cooks

I hope you enjoyed this ’roundup’.  See ya again soon, partner!

recipe-roundup